Getting into the Abandoned Waterpark in Hue in 2019

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The city of Hue, located in central Vietnam, is best known for its rich history and Imperial city. However, in recent years, a few people have discovered a much creepier attraction in Hue: the Hồ Thủy Tiên abandoned waterpark. What was once a popular amusement park is now a jungle of graffiti-covered waterslides, shattered aquariums, and murky pools that will make you feel like you just survived an apocalypse. Hồ Thủy Tiên is eerily beautiful and was arguably one of the most interesting things we did in Hue.

Why did the Hue Waterpark Close?

The waterpark was a multimillion dollar project, and was open for less than a year before it closed down in 2004. No one seems to know why the waterpark closed down. In a way, that adds to the mystery of this place. Rumor has it that 3 alligators were left behind after the park closed, occasionally fed by locals and left to roam the muddy waters. Allegedly, PETA also recently stepped in to rescue these alligators. Both of these rumors are most likely false, but make sure you don’t get too close to the water, just in case.

 
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How to get to the Abandoned Waterpark

The abandoned waterpark is a 20-minute drive outside of the center of Hue. You can rent a scooter from your hotel in Hue for around 100,000 VND (~$4.30 USD) for the day. The park is massive, so scootering is nice because you can also drive between the attractions inside the park. If you choose to take a Grab or taxi, show them that you are going to Hồ Thủy Tiên and they'll know where to drop you off. You'll still be able to walk everywhere in the park, it'll just be slightly less convenient than scootering.

 
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How to break into the Hue Waterpark

Okay, so you don't really need to do much to break in. If you arrive at the front entrance there will most likely be a security guard there to stop you. He will look around nervously to see if anyone's watching and then will ask for a payment of 10,000-20,000 VND ($0.44-0.88 USD) per person. Once you get past him, you're in the clear.

However, more and more people have been getting turned away at this front entrance. If this happens, you can also drive around the back on a smaller gravel road and get in from there. The waterpark still receives many visitors per day, so we weren’t worried about getting in any real trouble for sneaking in.

The Main Attractions in the Abandoned Waterpark

There are three main areas in the waterpark that you can explore. Front and center is a large three-story dragon, crouched over what used to be an aquarium. The building is filled with graffiti, overgrown plants, shattered glass, and some funny ocean themed statues.

 
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You can also walk up to the inside of the dragon’s mouth for a panoramic view of the lake.

 
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The second area is a series of waterslides leading down to a dark algae-infested pool that you definitely wouldn’t want to fall into.

 
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The third area is an amphitheater surrounding a pool, though it’s unclear what kind of shows they used to have here.

After almost a year in Southeast Asia, we really haven’t seen anything like this place. If you have temple fatigue, or are sick of all the beautiful islands and beaches here, this may just be what you’re looking for.

 
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More Adventures in Vietnam:

The Illicit Poem Mountain Hike - Ha Long, Vietnam

Have you visited this creepy abandoned waterpark? We’d love to hear about your experience!

lucille benoitComment